Competition among pathogens

Research at the University of Konstanz has identified a molecule that allows the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa to inhibit its rival, Staphylococcus aureus - Possible basis for the development of new antibiotics

Bacteria of the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are among the most common hospital germs, causing a variety of infections in humans, some of them deadly. Through interaction as partners or rivals they can substantially influence the development and progression of polymicrobial infections. In a study conducted by Dr Thomas Böttcher and doctoral researcher Dávid Szamosvári, the scientists were able to identify a molecule - an unsaturated quinolone N-oxide - which they suspect is one of the main agents in these interactions. It allows Pseudomonas aeruginosa to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. The molecule could therefore be used as a basis for a new generation of tailor-made antibiotics. The science journal “Angewandte Chemie” will publish the research findings in its June 2017 issue, showcasing Böttcher and Szamosvári’s work on the cover. An online preview of the article is available for reading now. index.php?eID=tx_nawsecuredl&u=0&g=0&t=1512003714&hash=a9e698f11c72753ff55409dc488a95ca1a3d7acd&file=fileadmin/infokosmos_typ0/chembio/Pressemitteilungen/PM_048_2017_Competition_among_pathogens.pdfRead more...